SSPC Releases Four New, Three Revised Standards in December – SSPC
Back to News

SSPC Releases Four New, Three Revised Standards in December

December 18, 2019

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania – SSPC: The Society for Protective Coatings announced today the release of four new and three revised technical standards.  Please click the title of each standard below to see the details and descriptions of the standards.

The four new standards include:

Committee Name: C.8.1, Commercial Cleaning and Painting
Committee Chair Name and Company:  Sam Scaturro, Alpine Painting
Description of Contents:
This new standard will assist specifiers, contractors and inspectors in determining the acceptability of a coating applied over concrete or masonry substrates. It establishes classification categories for the quantity of pinholes that appear in a defined area of applied coating and provides a procedure for defining the areas of applied coating that will be inspected. Evaluation of the coating is performed with the unaided eye at a distance of approximately 30 cm (12 inches) from the coated surface. The default Pinhole Frequency Level is Moderate (11 to 20 pinholes per ~1 square foot area) unless otherwise specified in the procurement documents. In this standard, no distinction is made between pinholes that expose an underlying coating layer and those that extend to the substrate, but the user is cautioned that procurement documents may have much more stringent acceptance criteria in some service environments.

Stakeholders Value Statement (how the standard can be used):
The standard can be also used by coatings manufacturers and testing laboratories to evaluate coating formulations and applied coatings.  It is not intended to be used on steel or metal substrates, nor is it intended for use with coatings that are aggregate-filled, stipple-finished, or intentionally porous.

Committee Name: C.7.3, Surface Preparation of Concrete and Cementitious Materials
Committee Chair Name and Company: Sam Scaturro, Alpine Painting and Sandblasting
Description of Contents:
This group of three new standards was developed to define levels of surface cleanliness for blast cleaned concrete substrates, parallel to the SSPC/NACE joint blast cleaning standards for steel substrates. The standards include requirements for removal of unsound surface deposits, efflorescence, and laitance as well as other visible surface contaminants; the degree to which existing coating must be removed; and the degree to which surface air voids must be opened. Cleanliness of the surface is evaluated visually prior to coating application. As with the blast cleaning standards for steel substrates, the standards also contain requirements for materials and methods used in the cleaning process.

Stakeholders Value Statement (how the standard can be used):
These standards assist owners and specifiers who develop project requirements that involve blast cleaning of concrete to a standard defined level of cleanliness. They provide contractors and inspectors with benchmarks and acceptance criteria for each of three specified levels of cleanliness.

Committee Name: C.7.3, Surface Preparation of Concrete and Cementitious Materials
Committee Chair Name and Company: Sam Scaturro, Alpine Painting and Sandblasting
Description of Contents:
This group of three new standards was developed to define levels of surface cleanliness for blast cleaned concrete substrates, parallel to the SSPC/NACE joint blast cleaning standards for steel substrates. The standards include requirements for removal of unsound surface deposits, efflorescence, and laitance as well as other visible surface contaminants; the degree to which existing coating must be removed; and the degree to which surface air voids must be opened. Cleanliness of the surface is evaluated visually prior to coating application. As with the blast cleaning standards for steel substrates, the standards also contain requirements for materials and methods used in the cleaning process.

Stakeholders Value Statement (how the standard can be used):
These standards assist owners and specifiers who develop project requirements that involve blast cleaning of concrete to a standard defined level of cleanliness. They provide contractors and inspectors with benchmarks and acceptance criteria for each of three specified levels of cleanliness.

Committee Name: C.7.3, Surface Preparation of Concrete and Cementitious Materials
Committee Chair Name and Company: Sam Scaturro, Alpine Painting and Sandblasting
Description of Contents:
This group of three new standards was developed to define levels of surface cleanliness for blast cleaned concrete substrates, parallel to the SSPC/NACE joint blast cleaning standards for steel substrates. The standards include requirements for removal of unsound surface deposits, efflorescence, and laitance as well as other visible surface contaminants; the degree to which existing coating must be removed; and the degree to which surface air voids must be opened. Cleanliness of the surface is evaluated visually prior to coating application. As with the blast cleaning standards for steel substrates, the standards also contain requirements for materials and methods used in the cleaning process.

Stakeholders Value Statement (how the standard can be used):
These standards assist owners and specifiers who develop project requirements that involve blast cleaning of concrete to a standard defined level of cleanliness. They provide contractors and inspectors with benchmarks and acceptance criteria for each of three specified levels of cleanliness.

The three revised standards include:

Committee Name: C.5.6, Occupational Safety and Health Committee
Committee Chair Name and Company:  Chris Peightal, KTA-Tator, Inc.
Description of Contents/ Technical Revisions:
 The 2019 version is an extensive overhaul and updating of of the original material from the version issued in 2007.

Stakeholders Value Statement (how the standard can be used):
The guide is intended to assist industrial coating and lining contractors developing corporate safety programs. It focuses on the needs of painting contractors operating within the U.S. who are subject to requirements of the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Core elements of a corporate safety program are discussed, and a summary of the most frequently referenced U.S. regulations that require employee safety training is included. Examples of the content of forms and statements that should be included in a contractor’s safety manual, such as statements of safety goals, corporate safety responsibilities, and safe operating procedures for “deadman” controls and vehicle operation are provided.

Committee Name: C.1.1 Zinc-Rich Coatings
Committee Chair Name and Company: 
Kristin Leonard, ExxonMobil
Description of Contents/ Technical Revisions:
The 2020 revision of SSPC-Paint 20 converts the standard from a hybrid formulation/performance based standard to a purely formulation-based standard.

  • All performance requirements, including requirements for accelerated laboratory weathering and physical tests of applied films, have been removed. For performance requirements, consult SSPC-Paint 29, Zinc Dust Pigmented Primer, Performance-Based.
  • The 2020 revision retains the 2004 Types (organic and inorganic) and the Zinc Dust Level Classifications based on amount of zinc dust by weight present in the dry film, but requires the zinc dust to meet ASTM D520 Type II requirement for maximum lead content of 0.01% by weight. The 2004 version permitted use of Type I zinc with unrestricted lead content.
  • In keeping with the Standards Review Committee’s May 2007 decision to remove inspection language from all SSPC standards, the 2004 inspection section has been deleted.
  • The list of referenced standards has been updated. References to the Fed-Std-141 have been removed.
  • An example of language to use when specifying SSPC-Paint 20 has been added in a non-mandatory note.
  • A note has been added explaining that the ASTM D6580 standard for determining metallic zinc content of a pigment will result in a significantly lower percentage of metallic zinc than the percentage obtained by using the procedure used in D521. The committee retained the D521 requirement from the 2004 version of SSPC-Paint 20.

Stakeholders Value Statement (how the standard can be used):
This revision of SSPC-Paint 20 is intended for use by specifiers who prefer to reference a formulation-based standard for zinc-rich coatings with a default minimum zinc loading requirement greater than 65%.

Committee Name: C.1.3.D, Polyurethane Coatings
Committee Chair Name and Company: Ahren Olson, Covestro
Description of Contents/ Technical Revisions:
This revision of the 2007 version of Paint 40 incorporates language revisions parallel to the 2017 revision of SSPC-Paint 41, including references to SSPC-PA 15, “Method for Preparation of Coated Test Panels,” and SSPC-PA 16, “Method for Evaluating Scribe Undercutting on Coated Steel Test Panels Following Corrosion Testing,” which were issued after the 2007 revision of Paint 40 was completed. The water required for immersion testing has been changed from deionized water to potable water. The table summarizing performance requirements has been divided into two tables, one for physical test requirements, the other for accelerated laboratory test requirements. In addition, the description of Type I formulations no longer implies that Type I coatings can be used in continuous immersion. Coatings classified as Type II must meet fresh water immersion testing requirements and can be used in fresh water (continuous) immersion service. Other changes are considered editorial.

Stakeholders Value Statement (how the standard can be used):
This standard contains minimum laboratory performance properties for SSPC-Paint 40, a moisture-curing primer containing zinc as a corrosion inhibitive pigment. The standard can be used by coating manufacturers to benchmark performance properties for their products, and by specifiers to set qualification criteria. Coatings meeting requirements of Paint 40 are suitable for use under compatible intermediate and topcoats (often other polyurethane coatings) and can cure in the presence of moisture. The required amount of humidity necessary for proper cure varies with the formulation, so this is not addressed in the standard.

All standards are available for download on the SSPC website via the Standards Download Tool and accessible on the SSPC mobile app. Access to standards is free to SSPC members.

Questions about this revision, as well as any others regarding SSPC standards development and technical committees, can be directed to Aimee Beggs at beggs@sspc.org or 412-281-2331, x2223.

###